LFD430

LFD430

LFD430

 

Developing Linux Device Drivers

Learn how to develop device drivers for Linux systems. This course will teach you about the different types of Linux device drivers as well as the appropriate APIs and methods through which devices interface with the kernel.

 

Book your LFD430 training at our Linux Foundation Authorized Training Partners.

 

Audience

This course is designed for anyone interested in learning how to write device drivers for Linux. Students should be proficient in the C programming language and be familiar with basic Linux utilities and text editors.

 

Course Materials

As part of your registration, a printed copy of the course manual will be provided.

 

Prerequisites

Knowledge of basic kernel interfaces and methods such as how to write, compile, load and unload modules, use synchronization primitives, and the basics of memory allocation and management, such as is provided by LFD420. Pre-class preparation material will be provided before class.

 

Course Outline

Developing Linux Device Drivers

  1. Introduction
  2. Preliminaries
  3. Device Drivers
  4. Modules and Device Drivers
  5. Memory Management and Allocation
  6. Character Devices
  7. Kernel Features
  8. Transferring Between User and Kernel Space
  9. Interrupts and Exceptions
  10. Timing Measurements
  11. Kernel Timers
  12. ioctls
  13. Unified Device Model and sysfs
  14. Firmware
  15. Sleeping and Wait Queues
  16. Interrupt Handling: Deferrable Functions and User Drivers
  17. Hardware I/O
  18. PCI
  19. Platform Drivers**
  20. Device Trees**
  21. Direct Memory Access (DMA)
  22. Network Drivers I: Basics
  23. Network Drivers II: Data Structures
  24. Network Drivers III: Transmission and Reception
  25. Network Drivers IV: Selected Topics
  26. USB Drivers
  27. Power Management
  28. Block Drivers
** These sections may be considered in part or in whole as optional. They contain either background reference material, specialized topics, or advanced subjects. The instructor may choose to cover or not cover them depending on classroom experience and time constraints.